Reader Comments

Fruit of the Poisonous Tree

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Ultimately a sad tale, as is any narrative of true crime. In hindsight, it's easy to point out where someone stepped on to a wrong path, or committed to an unwise decision. It's even sadder when those who suffer are young. Deeply researched and detailed account. – M. Anne-Marie Forbes

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

In this true crime thriller, police search for missing teenage Robin Adams. The case grips small town Michigan, especially because of the rumors of a Ouija board warning that predicted Robin would not live to see her 17th birthday. Add in rumors of possession, a minister accused of devil worship and you have a story worthy of a horror novel – but his is all true. Disturbing, crime writing at its best. – Rosemary Smith (Librarian)

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

 While this book looks like a scary novel, this is the true story of a murdered teenager in a small town. It is well written, and you can tell that the author really put some time into researching this interesting story. Although it is true, it is such a horrific crime that instinctively you want to think that this is just a horror novel. The crime itself left a definite impression on me that will remain for quite some time. I would recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in true crime – marilyn rhea

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

I think a part of the problem I had with this book was that when it came up on my Kindle it was formatted strangely so it was difficult going. Otherwise the book was interesting enough. The writing detracted from what was actually a very interesting story. I struggled to get through the book and did skip through some parts. – Laura Schleif

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

 An extremely exhaustive true crime book (with an index!) A nasty man digs a grave even before he attacks his ex-girlfriend. Some nice writing. An excellent but very long book. I have a local friend here who recently wrote about a cold case of 20 years, and this book had much more immediacy and captured emotion. I'm continually amazed at the number of battered women who don't read the signs and get the hell out. Maybe it's the whining apologies the beaters make and promises never to do it again. I guess some people are just always hopeful that the last time will never happen again. The title is much better than the Murder in the Thumb one. I immediately thought of someone being strangled with the thumb image, but this title is very compelling and intriguing. The Ouija board aspect, and that crazy Goldie, might be more ornament than critical to the plot, although the psychic guy was invaluable and shows that that line of inquiry can often works with genuine psychics. – Paul Froiland (Educator)

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

 It’s a terrible thing when life is cut short. It’s more so when it becomes a cold case for no fault of those involved trying to bring justice to a victim that has to wait for it. Richard W. Carson brings you into the story with eyes wide open in a no nonsense reality that will you unable to put this book down until that last page where you-the reader-letting out your breathe of relief and cheering for the good guys! This page turner is very much a gripping tale from the first chapter. It is good to see justice prevail as it should. I will be recommended it to anyone who will listen and request that the Barryton Library brings in its own copy. I sincerely hope that we will hear more from Mr. Carson in the future.  Well done. – Tricia Morrison-Stork

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

This was a very interesting book, and anyone that reads true crime will find this book informative and well thought out. The author has done a wonderful job of showing the human side of everyone involved in the case. You feel that you know everyone that is involved and you are right there with them as they build a case and remember Robin Adams. – Pamela King (Librarian)

Great true crime story. Robin Adams had an unstable upbringing.  The family she was living with had a daughter a year younger. The two began dabbling with a Ouija board. Soon, things got freaky. They would hear strange sounds at odd times. One day they asked how long Robin would live. The board “said” she would die before she was 17. Little did anyone know that it would just one year off. Then, the charismatic Melvin walked into her life starting a train ride to disaster that ultimately cost Robin her life.  This is a riveting story. – Joyce Rector

Following are reviews of Murder in the Thumb, the text version from which Poisonous Tree is derived.